The Book of Life Read online





  ALSO BY DEBORAH HARKNESS

  A Discovery of Witches

  Shadow of Night

  VIKING

  Published by the Penguin Group

  Penguin Group (USA) LLC

  375 Hudson Street

  New York, New York 10014

  USA | Canada | UK | Ireland | Australia | New Zealand | India | South Africa | China penguin.com

  A Penguin Random House Company

  First published by Viking Penguin, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, 2014

  Copyright (c) 2014 by Deborah Harkness Penguin supports copyright. Copyright fuels creativity, encourages diverse voices, promotes free speech, and creates a vibrant culture. Thank you for buying an authorized edition of this book and for complying with copyright laws by not reproducing, scanning, or distributing any part of it in any form without permission. You are supporting writers and allowing Penguin to continue to publish books for every reader.

  LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CATALOGING-IN-PUBLICATION DATA Harkness, Deborah E.

  The book of life : a novel / Deborah Harkness.

  pages cm.--(All souls trilogy; 3) ISBN 978-0-69816347-8

  1. Witches--Fiction. 2. Women historians--Fiction. 3. Vampires--Fiction. 4. Science and magic--Fiction. 5. Time travel--Fiction. I. Title.

  PS3608.A7436B66 2014

  813'.6--dc23 2014004495

  Publisher's note: This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are the product of the author's imagination or are used fictitiously, and any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, businesses, companies, events, or locales is entirely coincidental.

  Version_1

  For Karen, who knows why

  Contents

  Also by Deborah Harkness

  Title Page

  Copyright

  Dedication

  Epigraph

  Chapter 1

  Chapter 2

  Chapter 3

  Chapter 4

  Chapter 5

  Chapter 6

  Chapter 7

  Chapter 8

  Chapter 9

  Chapter 10

  Chapter 11

  Chapter 12

  Chapter 13

  Chapter 14

  Chapter 15

  Chapter 16

  Chapter 17

  Chapter 18

  Chapter 19

  Chapter 20

  Chapter 21

  Chapter 22

  Chapter 23

  Chapter 24

  Chapter 25

  Chapter 26

  Chapter 27

  Chapter 28

  Chapter 29

  Chapter 30

  Chapter 31

  Chapter 32

  Chapter 33

  Chapter 34

  Chapter 35

  Chapter 36

  Chapter 37

  Chapter 38

  Chapter 39

  Chapter 40

  Chapter 41

  Acknowledgments

  It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is most adaptable to change.

  --PHILIPPE DE CLERMONT,

  OFTEN ATTRIBUTED TO CHARLES DARWIN

  Sol in Cancer

  The signe of the Crabbe pertains to houses, lands, treasures, and whatever is hidden. It is the fourth house of the Zodiak. It signifies death and the end of thinges.

  --Anonymous English Commonplace Book, c. 1590,

  Goncalves MS 4890, f. 8r

  Ghosts didn't have much substance. All they were composed of was memories and heart. Atop one of Sept-Tours' round towers, Emily Mather pressed a diaphanous hand against the spot in the center of her chest that even now was heavy with dread.

  Does it ever get easier? Her voice, like the rest of her, was almost imperceptible. The watching? The waiting? The knowing?

  Not that I've noticed, Philippe de Clermont replied shortly. He was perched nearby, studying his own transparent fingers. Of all the things Philippe disliked about being dead--the inability to touch his wife, Ysabeau; his lack of smell or taste; the fact that he had no muscles for a good sparring match--invisibility topped the list. It was a constant reminder of how inconsequential he had become.

  Emily's face fell, and Philippe silently cursed himself. Since she'd died, the witch had been his constant companion, cutting his loneliness in two. What was he thinking, barking at her as if she were a servant?

  Perhaps it will be easier when they don't need us anymore, Philippe said in a gentler tone. He might be the more experienced ghost, but it was Emily who understood the metaphysics of their situation. What the witch had told him went against everything Philippe believed about the afterworld. He thought the living saw the dead because they needed something from them: assistance, forgiveness, retribution. Emily insisted these were nothing more than human myths, and it was only when the living moved on and let go that the dead could appear to them.

  This information made Ysabeau's failure to notice him somewhat easier to bear, but not much.

  "I can't wait to see Em's reaction. She's going to be so surprised." Diana's warm alto floated up to the battlements.

  Diana and Matthew, Emily and Philippe said in unison, peering down to the cobbled courtyard that surrounded the chateau.

  There, Philippe said, pointing at the drive. Even dead, he had vampire sight that was sharper than any human's. He was also still handsomer than any man had a right to be, with his broad shoulders and devilish grin. He turned the latter on Emily, who couldn't help grinning back. They are a fine couple, are they not? Look how much my son has changed.

  Vampires weren't supposed to be altered by the passing of time, and therefore Emily expected to see the same black hair, so dark it glinted blue; the same mutable gray-green eyes, cool and remote as a winter sea; the same pale skin and wide mouth. There were a few subtle differences, though, as Philippe suggested. Matthew's hair was shorter, and he had a beard that made him look even more dangerous, like a pirate. She gasped.

  Is Matthew . . . bigger?

  He is. I fattened him up when he and Diana were here in 1590. Books were making him soft. Matthew needed to fight more and read less. Philippe had always contended there was such a thing as too much education. Matthew was living proof of it.

  Diana looks different, too. More like her mother, with that long, coppery hair, Em said, acknowledging the most obvious change in her niece.

  Diana stumbled on a cobblestone, and Matthew's hand shot out to steady her. Once, Emily had seen Matthew's incessant hovering as a sign of vampire overprotectiveness. Now, with the perspicacity of a ghost, she realized that this tendency stemmed from his preternatural awareness of every change in Diana's expression, every shift of mood, every sign of fatigue or hunger. Today, however, Matthew's concern seemed even more focused and acute.

  It's not just Diana's hair that has changed. Philippe's face had a look of wonder. Diana is with child--Matthew's child.

  Emily examined her niece more carefully, using the enhanced grasp of truth that death afforded. Philippe was right--in part. You mean "with children." Diana is having twins.

  Twins, Philippe said in an awed voice. He looked away, distracted by the appearance of his wife. Look, here are Ysabeau and Sarah with Sophie and Margaret.

  What will happen now, Philippe? Emily asked, her heart growing heavier with anticipation.

  Endings. Beginnings, Philippe said with deliberate vagueness. Change.

  Diana has never liked change, Emily said.

  That is because Diana is afraid of what she must become, Philippe replied.

  *

  Marcus Whitmore had faced horrors aplenty since the night in 1781 when Matthew de Clermont made him a vam